Excellent Conditions Provides Great Start to the Abalone Season

The first day of the 2017/18 metropolitan abalone season occurred on Saturday 9th December and thousands of fishers enjoyed near perfect conditions allowing them to easily catch their bag limit.

Fisheries scientists monitoring the day reported excellent catches with some bags (15 Abalone) weighing in at just under 3kg. The good catches can be attributed to a mixture of excellent weather conditions which allowed fishers to be selective in which Abalone they collected and provided an opportunity for fishers to venture to the back of the reefs where larger abalone can be found.

Nice calm condtions allowed for fishers to get a good feed of Abalone on day one of the season.

While recent management changes (which included moving fishing to a Saturday) are likely to have been responsible for a small reduction in the number of people fishing, these same changes ensure the fishery will only open when the weather conditions pose an acceptable risk.

In previous years the season-opening days were set in stone and if weather conditions happened to be terrible on the day then people would still be permitted to fish. Fishing on days with bad weather not only poses substantial safety concerns for both fishers and rescue personnel it also reduces the level of enjoyment.

This year, the final decision to proceed with Saturday’s fishing was taken by Fisheries on Wednesday morning after advice from Surf Life Saving WA (SLSWA) that predicted weather conditions on the day did not pose a high risk for anyone.

In order to provide Fisheries with advice about the predicted risk level, SLSWA developed a Hazardous Surf Prediction Model which takes account of Wind, Swell, Tide and Wave period. This model recommends closing a fishing day if a high risk is forecast.

Trigg, a popular Abalone fishing spot in Perth.

Weather conditions that will lead to a recommendation to close a fishing day include:
• If the Swell is 3 meters or greater
• OR – if the combined Tide and Swell is Rating 12 or more, this is to be considered high risk.
• OR – if the offshore wind speed is greater than 22 knots (Force 6 on the Beaufort Wind Scale),
• OR – if the combined Period and Swell is Rating 10 or more.

In the event a fishing day is cancelled it will be replaced with another day when conditions are better. This is the first time fisher safety has played such a central role in recreational fishing management and hopefully, these changes will lead to the fishery once again being known as an amazing recreational fishery on the doorstep of a capital city, rather than the most dangerous recreational fishery in the world.

The next scheduled open day on this fishery is the 13th January 2018 with the Department of Fisheries making a final decision on the 10th following advice from Surf Lifesaving WA.

Sign the Petition to Save Canal Rocks Boat Ramp

Click HERE to sign the petition to save Canal Rocks Boat Ramp!

The recreational fishing community has been angered over the past few weeks as plans to close an important boat ramp in the South-West region became apparent. 

Canal Rocks Boat Ramp, near Yallingup, has provided fishers access to important local fishing spots for decades. Recently, however, the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA) is considering closing the ramp, citing safety concerns.

This has been met with anger and frustration from both local and visiting fishers who are set to lose access to one of the South-West’s most loved aquatic playgrounds.

Recfishwest Operations Manager Leyland Campbell who spoke at the rally to hundreds of concerned locals , said the peak body is disappointed not to have been consulted and that all options to keep the ramp open are not being considered.

”We will advocate for the ramp to remain open as it is actually one of the safest ramps in the region and DBCA claims about safety simply don’t add up.”

“The Department of Biodiversity, Conservations and Attractions claim this ramp doesn’t meet Australian Standards (exposure to waves greater than 20cm) however, the standards they are choosing to apply are for boat ramps within marinas, not oceanic ramps. If the government applied this standard to all oceanic boat ramps in Western Australia then over 90% of these ramps would be closed. This is simply not acceptable and cannot go unchallenged.”

“While Recfishwest has a strong track record in advocating for fishing safety, we recognise people must take personal responsibility. It is not the Government’s role to protect the community from every conceivable risk, but it is the Governement’s role to provide the basic community infrastructure required to support our culture and lifestyle.” Mr Campbell said.

“The fishing public of Western Australia accept the risks associated with operating a vessel anywhere in our state, including using discretion to assess any ramp for a safe launch and retrieve.”

Recfishwest believe access to high-quality experiences, including fishing, are paramount to the West Australian lifestyle and must be maintained.

Local fisher Glenn Wakelam can’t believe the ramp is being considered for closure.

“This is such a popular ramp during the summer months. On a nice day, it is not unusual to find over 20 trailers in the carpark.”

“Canal Rocks Boat Ramp has been used by the public for decades and the wave height has not changed over that time.”

“People aren’t stupid if the swell is too big, they don’t use the ramp.” Mr Wakelan said

Recfishwest has written to the Environment Minister urging him to reconsider this decision but we need your help to ensure the message is heard loud and clear.

What can you do to help?

1. Sign the petition, HERE.
2. Contact your local MP, and tell them how important it is that we have recreational boating facilities around our great state. Whilst you may not launch at Canal Rocks, your local ramp could be next on the list.
3. Tell everyone you know. The more we can let decision makers know how important access to great fishing experiences is to us, the better our chances of a decision in our favour.

Community Heroes Keeping Fishers Safe in the Gascoyne

It is common knowledge that the WA coast can be unforgiving. In our state alone we have lost 27 people from rock fishing incidents since 2002, an alarmingly high number for our beloved past time. This is a strong reminder that fishers must always consider the dangers when fishing along our coast.

Recfishwest wants you and your family to return home safe after a day’s fishing, and because of that we are proud to work with our community partners, government and the public to make that a reality through fishing safety initiatives around WA.

Earlier this month Recfishwest’s Safety Officer Bronte Nardi, traveled to the Gascoyne to work with rock fishing safety partners to see how the safety initiatives were progressing and to discuss some potential improvements in the area.

Tim and Sara at Quobba Station have been fantastic with their support of Angel Rings and life jackets.

Recently, Recfishwest has been working with the owners of Quobba Station who have installed new Angel Rings (Life Rings) at high-risk fishing locations along the Quobba coast. They believe in the program and have been more than willing to get their hands dirty and lend a hand.

Angel rings are also located at two other hardcore fishing locations in the Gascoyne, Steep Point and Dirk Hartog Island, where plenty of avid fishers venture each year for their thrill of land-based game fishing, but who sometimes come unstuck on the rocks. 

Angel Rings are not the only piece of safety equipment available in the Gascoyne region to ensure you return home safe after landing some great catches of shore-based Mackerel or Tuna. You can also make the most of Recfishwest’s FREE Loan Life Jacket Program, where you can hire (at no cost) slimline, lightweight fishing life jackets, the Crewsaver 165. We have locations in the area with local businesses such as Carnarvon Tackle and Marine, Tel-O-Mac Tackle (Carnarvon), Quobba Station and Steep Point Ranger Station supporting the program, so why not pay them a visit, talk fishing and grab a free jacket for the day?!

Bronte Nardi said a lot of people in the WA community are working tirelessly to keep rock fishers safe.

‘’Without the support of local businesses, the FREE Loan Life Jacket Program would not exist.’’

“These operators are locals, they know the conditions and they want to see an end to fishing fatalities in their towns,” Bronte said.

Recfishwest is once again stressing the importance of taking personal responsibility for your own safety while fishing, by observing conditions and using appropriate safety equipment.

On your next fishing trip with your family and friends to the Gascoyne, please make sure you stay safe, wear a life jacket (hire a free one) and return home safe.

 

 

 

Safety Equipment Available in the Gascoyne: 

Free Loan Life Jacket Retailers: 

Carnarvon Tackle and Marine
Tel-O-Mac Tackle (Carnarvon)
Quobba Station
Steep Point Ranger Station

Locations of Angel Rings:

Dirk Hartog Island:
– Quion Head
– Urchin Point
– West Point

Steep Point:
– False Entrance
– Thunder Bay Blow Holes
– The Oven
– The Fault Line

Quobba:
– Blowholes
– Old Boundary
– Loopy’s
– High Rock
– 2 Mile
– Whistling Rock
– The Ledge
– Camp Rock
– The Caves

Recfishwest’s Statewide Fish and Survive Program, including the Free Life Jacket Loan Scheme, is proudly funded by the Department of Primary Industries & Regional Development, Division of Fisheries.

Fishing Safety – It’s Your Responsibility

With the saddening news of the latest rock fishing fatality at Quobba, Recfishwest is appealing to rock fishers to fish safely, especially during the Winter months.

Our condolences are with the man’s family, who tragically lost his life while fishing from Quobba’s High Rock, after being swept in on August 13.

High Rock – Quobba

Quobba can produce some great land based fishing opportunities, but the risk to you, your friends and family is very high. With vertical cliffs, jagged sharp rocks and big swell, Quobba fishing should only be attempted by people with the right gear and are experienced rock fishers.

Recfishwest has been working with the owners of Quobba Station over the past few months who have recently installed new Angel Rings (Life Rings) at high risk fishing locations along the Quobba coast. We understand that one of the Angel Rings was thrown in a rescue attempt during the incident.

Locations of the Nine Angel Rings recently installed at Quobba are:
Blowholes
Old Boundary
Loopy’s
High Rock
2 Mile
Whistling Rock
The Ledge
Camp Rock
The Caves

Angel Rings are not the only safety equipment that can be used at Quobba to ensure you return home safe. Quobba Stationis a location for Recfishwest’s FREE Life Jacket Loan Scheme, where FREE compact fishing life jackets can be loaned for rock fishers. FREE life jackets can also be loaned from Carnarvon Tackle and Marine, and Tel-O-Mac Tackle (Carnarvon).

Some time ago, passionate and safe rock fishers, also installed rock anchor points into the cliffs at Quobba, adding an additional option for rock fishers to tie themselves onto.

Knowing winter serves up rougher weather conditions (particularly on the West Coast), it is a strong reminder that fishers must always consider the dangers when fishing along our coast.

Wearing a slim line life jacket won’t impede on your fishing.

Recfishwest Fishing Safety Officer Bronte Nardi said a lot of people in the WA (and Australian) community are working tirelessly to keep rock fishers safe, now it’s time for rock fishers to help by minimising the risk of them going in the water.

“Over 150 FREE Life Jackets can loaned from a lot WA tackle shops, Angel Rings are being installed by land managers at high risk fishing locations, fishing safety awareness material are being produced – now we need people who fish from rocks to eliminate

Old rock anchor points at Quobba should be used to tie yourself onto whilst fishing.

the risks, prepare accordingly and return home safe,” Ms Nardi appealed.

 

“It’s never nice hearing the news of a missing fisher, and the feeling was definitely echoed through the community, as the majority of people understand the dangers of rock fishing,” Ms Nardi said.

“Recfishwest are once again stressing the importance of taking personal responsibility of your own safety while fishing, by observing conditions and using appropriate safety equipment.”

 

If you must fish from the rocks, please follow these simple fishing safety messages:
• Know how to swim
• Wear a life jacket
• Never fish alone
• Observe first, fish later
• Use appropriate safety equipment
• Tell someone your plans

For more Information on rock fishing safety please visit, http://recfishwest.org.au/our-services/fishing-safety/ or www.fishandsurvive.com.au

WA Needs More Fishing Heroes!

Our Purpose is to ensure Great Fishing Experiences for all in the WA community forever.
Our Commitment is to Protect, Promote and Develop Sustainable, Accessible, Enjoyable and Safe fishing for the benefit of the community.

Thanks to our current supporters, Recfishwest can continue the fight to keep fishing great in WA.

Our role is to: 
– Be your voice that would not otherwise be heard
– Be the voice of the fish that otherwise goes unheard or ignored
– Keep you informed of all thing affecting your fishing, 24/7; we believe you need to know!
– Strive to ensure you and your family return home safe after a day’s fishing
– Defend your fishing rights when your local fishing spot is under threat
– Fight when access to fishing areas is put at risk
– Roll up our sleeves and find a solution when no one else will.

Contribute to what we do and support us, become a member and let us do the hard yakka on your behalf.  We don’t make profits here at Recfishwest and we make sure all our resources go directly towards our action to protect, promote and develop our fishing environments and to keep you fishing.

To give you an idea of where your support helps us make fishing better:
• Stocking of important recreational fish species around WA, including Pink Snapper, Barramundi, Prawns, Mulloway and Freshwater Trout
• Development, design and deployment of Artificial Reefs in Western Australia
• Development of important fishing research and conservation programs
• Development of WA’s ‘Fish and Survive’ program, to ensure all fishers come home safe after a day’s fishing
• Delivery of WA’s only state-wide fishing clinic program to thousands of kids in both metro and regional areas

A strong membership base allows us to pursue matters that affect your fishing with added confidence knowing you’ve got our back, just like we’ve got yours!

For just 50c per week, you can help us protect and develop fishing experiences in Western Australia, for the community forever.

Our Position on Mandatory Wearing of Life Jackets on Boats

June 2017

Currently, the WA Department of Transport is conducting a review of recreational boating safety requirements and the public have been asked to put their views forward during the consultation period.

Safety equipment items under review include:

  • lifejackets;
  • distress signals – EPIRBs, PLBs and flares;
  • radios and distress signalling sheets;
  • compasses and GPSs;
  • fire extinguishers; and,
  • miscellaneous equipment (first aid, lighting, paddles, bilge pumps, anchors).

Recfishwest is a key stakeholder and is represented on the Department of Transport’s External Reference Group which provides input from all the relevant water using sectors, including recreational fishing.

One topic that is being widely discussed is the consideration for the mandatory wearing of life jackets on recreational vessels.

 Please see below our position on the issue of the mandatory wearing of life jackets on recreational vessels:

  • We encourage and promote safe fishing experiences for all and equip fishers with the knowledge so they can make their own decision to fish or not to fish (as we do for rock fishing), and we believe this needs to be applied to vessel safety
  • We support increased education campaigns towards vessel owners, of the risks associated with their safety, it’s important that people have good knowledge to make their own informed decisions in specific situations
  • We do not support a blanket approach to make the wearing of life jackets on a boat mandatory

– Fishing in WA offers a large variety of boat and kayak fishing opportunities and simply having one strict rule covering all those situations is not something we support

– Where there’s evidence and statistics to support the wearing of life jackets in high-risk situations such as boat fishing at night or by yourself, like some other states, we would consider this approach instead

– We believe safety comes down to the individual and personal responsibility is the key factor

  • We believe educating boat fishers on the advancement of life jacket technology is important. There are some great slim fitting, compact life jackets that are designed to be worn on the market now, and for a really reasonable price.  Educating the boating public and empowering them to make their own choices is a better approach than making it compulsory

Recfishwest works hard to promote safety and we want to see all fishers return home safe at the end of a day’s fishing.

If you’d like to have your say, please visit the Department of Transport’s survey here.

WA Invention – A Must Have for Spearo’s

If you ever dive from a boat, you would have felt that horrible momentary feeling when you look around and for a second it has disappeared behind the waves leaving you thinking, what next?

Simon Mclernon (left), Vice President of Bluewater Freedivers of Western Australia (BFWA) ”..diving in remote locations always reminds me that the boat is our life line. The boat is our only chance to return home safe after a day of fishing.”

“As a diver, we trust that our boat will stay put but there is still a chance for something to go wrong and have our only lifeline drift away from us,” Mr Mclernon said.

BFWA is a club that has a strong emphasis on safety. From their experience diving in many offshore and remote locations across WA, divers from the club identified the need for a piece of safety equipment that would allow them to carry key survival gear such as bottled water, an EPIRB and flares with them at all times while in the water. Enter, the Bluewater Safety Float…

In 2014, the club embarked on a mission to create the Bluewater Safety Float to ensure that diving off Western Australia was as safe as possible. The club has since designed, built and field tested a dive float that is a must have for not only divers but boaties as well. The Bluewater Safety Float keeps all your safety gear in one spot and is ready when you need it most!

 

Introducing the Bluewater Safety Float! What you need to know:

  • It was designed by WA  spearos and divers
  • It is a high strength rigid float which has been tested for full submersion
  • This float has 19L of water tight storage volume and 20kg of buoyancy perfect for holding an EPIRP, flares, water and any additional safety gear when out on the water
  • It’s high flotation and shape allows it to be towed along by a diver with ease or support a tired crew member separated from their craft
  • It is constructed using high-quality materials and is UV resistant with a hi-vis colour that will not fade
  •  It has 3 high strength swivel attachment points, grab handles, a push in flagpole and dive flag
  •  If you’re a diver it will keep your safety gear with you and not in your boat that could be floating away with a snapped anchor rope
  • If you’re a boatie, it’s the ultimate grab bag for you to store all things safety and will give you added buoyancy when in the water.

How many times have we all had our safety gear checked at the ramp or seen others rummaging under the bow or in various compartments pulling out an EPIRB, flares and life jackets. It seems crazy that we pack safety gear sporadically, when you need it most you always want it in one easily accessible location.

Simon recently had an experience that highlighted to him the importance of this new innovation, “I was freediving with friends on a calm day several kilometres from shore when we came across a boat that was drifting through where we were diving. We noticed that there was no one on board and by the looks of the gear on board we figured they must be divers. My mate jumped in and drove the boat around where we could tie it up to ours while we continually scanned the waters for a lost diver. After about twenty worrying minutes we spotted a scuba diver surface about 100m away. With all his equipment it took the exhausted diver at least another 10min to swim over to us much slower than the speed that the boat was drifting. If we hadn’t been there they would’ve had no chance at chasing down their boat which had all their safety gear on board.”

While the original plan for the club was to develop enough for its members, its identified importance as a piece of safety equipment has meant the club has managed to make them now available for all fishers.

You can purchase your own Bluewater Safety Float from www.fishandsurvive.com.au

This initiative was sponsored by a Community Grant (Link to, https://recfishwest.org.au/funding-projects/small-grants/) and was supported by Recfishwest and the Department of Fisheries. The float is designed by WA fishers for WA conditions. All profits from sales of the Bluewater Safety Float will be invested back into fishing safety so that more initiatives like this can be undertaken to ensure WA fishers keep coming home safe.

 

Recfishwest Welcomes Continued Commitment to Support Safe Fishing as Major Milestone Achieved

Recfishwest welcomes continued commitment to support safe fishing as major milestone achieved.

In a huge achievement for fishing safety in WA, the 50th Angel Ring has recently been installed at high-risk fishing locations across the state and Recfishwest has plans to install plenty more in the coming year. Angel Rings (or Life Rings) are an important piece of public safety equipment and are an effective tool to help save lives, especially amongst rock fishers.

Recfishwest Chief Executive Officer Dr Andrew Rowland said fishing safety developments over the past few years had come on leaps and bounds and this is a milestone for which all involved should be very proud.

“Our commitment to improved safety stems from the fact that we want to see all fishers return safe to their family at the end of a days fishing,” Dr Rowland said.
“There is no better feeling than hearing one of these rings has been used to save a life.”

“Land managers around WA, including Department of Parks and Wildlife, Local Governments and station owners have been tremendous in helping install important safety infrastructure at high risk fishing locations along great expansions of the WA coastline.”

“The roll-out of Angel Rings has been driven by locals on the ground in the regions who want to help keep their community stay safe. These installations not only benefit fishers but all users, visitors and locals alike.”

“We are very pleased to see the McGowan Government support this program, whereby a relatively small amount of funding greatly increases public safety outcomes,” Dr Rowland said.

ENDS

___________________________
Recfishwest MEDIA CONTACT: Tim Grose, tim@recfishwest.org.au

If you must fish from rocks, Recfishwest wants fishers to understand the simple rock fishing safety messages:
• Know how to swim – If you can’t swim, fish from the beach
• Wear a Life Jacket –small fishing life jackets, designed for fishing, worn by all safe rock fishers are recommended
• Never fish alone – fish with friends and family
• Observe first, fish later – watch the ocean conditions, the beach is always safer
• Use appropriate safety equipment – if rock fishing, use rock boots, wear light weight clothing, take ropes to tie onto rock bolts, wear a life jacket
• Tell someone your plans – tell your family where you’re fishing and when you’ll be home

There is also no shortage of Free Life Jackets around WA that fishers can hire for the day to ensure they return home safe after a days fishing. To see where you can pick up a free life jacket, visit: https://recfishwest.org.au/rock-fishing-safety/
________________________________________
Fact File:
• In WA alone there have been 26 rock fishing deaths since 2002, despite this, some fishers are still putting themselves at risk of injury or death.
• Currently there are:
– 54 Angel Rings (Life Rings) installed at high risk fishing locations statewide (with another 9 to be installed soon) Current Locations include: Esperance & Surrounds, Albany & Surrounds, Denmark, South West Capes Region, Kalbarri, Quobba Station (9 to be installed), Steep Point, Dirk Hartog Island
– 36 Rock Anchor Points installed for fishers to tie themselves onto have been installed at high risk rock fishing locations on the south coast including: Esperance & Surrounds, Salmon Holes in Albany
– 21 locations have been established between Esperance and Carnarvon where the public can borrow 150 free life jackets.
• Recfishwest, under a contractual arrangement with the WA Department of Fisheries, leads the fishing safety program ‘Fish and Survive’ in WA, which aims to change behaviour of fishing safety through public awareness, promotion and communication of safety, and installation of safety equipment at high risk fishing locations across WA
• The Government has funded the program $140,000/yr for the next three years in a bid to reduce fishing related drownings and incidents.

Fish and Survive This Abalone Season

Fish and Survive This Abalone Season
Recfishwest and Surf Life Saving WA are urging people to remain mindful of the conditions and take personal responsibility for their actions through the abalone season which begins this Sunday, November 6.

The popular West Coast Zone Abalone season sees thousands of fishers take to the inshore reefs around the metropolitan coastline, during the one-hour fishing periods from 7am-8am on the first Sunday of each month until March. Recfishwest Chief Executive Officer Dr Andrew Rowland said Abalone is one of the most sought after shellfish with over 17,000 licence holders taking part in the fishery last year.

“We urge Abalone fishers to exercise caution whilst fishing and to be aware of the weather conditions,” Dr Rowland said.
“An early Abalone fishing session is a great way to spend the morning with the family as long as it is carried out safely.’’

The Abalone season is stretched out over several months and allows for plenty of opportunities for people to get out and fish for them.

“Quite simply, if the weather is unfavourable or you’re unsure of your ability in the water during rough conditions, don’t risk your life and go next month when the weather may be better,” Dr Rowland said.

A number of Surf Clubs with the support of Surf Life Saving Western Australia (SLSWA) will be putting on additional services for Sunday’s season opening, including the Wesfarmers Jetski response teams, while the Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter will cover key locations to watch over fishers.  Despite these extra services, SLSWA General Manger Chris Peck warns fishers not to be complacent.

“Since 2012 there have been 3 deaths while abalone fishing and in the past 3 years surf lifesaving services have had to perform 42 rescues of abalone fishers – an alarmingly high number for this one recreational activity,” Mr Peck said.

“Traditionally we will also see cases of hypothermia, or be required to perform resuscitations having retrieved fishers from the water where they may have been washed off the rocks. We urge fishers to consider their own lives, and the lives of those tasked to rescue them, before putting themselves and our volunteer lifesavers in dangerous situations for the sake of catching their quota of Abalone.”

Recfishwest and SLSWA have offered these tips for all Abalone fishers:
o Check conditions – before heading out check weather conditions, including wind conditions and swells. Visit www.beachsafe.org.au for up to date reports or download the free Beachsafe App.
o Observe first, fish later – do not attempt to fish if you are unsure. Read the warnings and dangers on any safety signs.
o Wear appropriate clothing or wetsuits – Avoid heavy clothing, including tracksuits and work boots that become water logged and heavy.
o Never fish alone – stay in a group and keep an eye out for your friends and other fishers.
o Don’t panic – if in trouble stay calm and raise one arm and wave from side to side to attract attention.
A bag limit of 15 Roe’s Abalone per person/ per day in the West Coast Zone applies.

For more information about Abalone, Download the Free Recfishwest Smartphone App for either iPhone or Android.

Media Contacts:
Tim Grose, Recfishwest, 0411 393 977, tim@recfishwest.org.au
Minda Penn, Surf Life Saving WA, 0408 901 959, mpenn@slswa.com.au

Kalbarri Fishing Club Making Safety Happen

The Kalbarri Offshore and Angling Club, along with community partners and the Department of Parks and Wildlife are doing their bit to keep fishers safe around the coast of Kalbarri.
A renown rock fishing location, the cliffs of Kalbarri present huge challenges for both beginners and experienced fishers. Although quality fish can be caught from the Kalbarri cliffs, the dangers that come with fishing here outweigh any fish.

Recfishwest provided 5 Angel Rings to the Kalbarri Offshore and Angling Club and DPaW to install at designated high-risk fishing locations, and with no hesitations installed the rings to ensure fishers are kept as safe as possible when rock fishing.

As reported in our last Broad Cast, Kalbarri Sports and Dive tackle shop are now a Free Life Jacket Loan location with 5 jackets available to hire for anyone going rock fishing in an extension of the state wide Life Jacket Loan scheme bringing the number of locations to 19. Recfishwest is thrilled with the efforts of the local fishing club, the tackle shop and community partners and shows they care about public safety and willing to help at all costs.

Kalbarri Angling and Offshore Fishing Club President Cheryl Eley said fishing is such an important recreation for locals and tourists here, that installing safety equipment on the rocks was essential to keeping fishers safe.

“We’re not experts in safety, but any safety initiative that involves the local community and strives to keep people safe, is a win win for the fishing club and the Kalbarri community” Cheryl said.

“We’re proud to be a part of the rock fishing safety initiative and the club guys who installed the rings deserve a huge pat on the back.”

“We had a local go in off the rocks over the Christmas period and one of the existing Angel Rings was used to save his life. That’s proof these devices work and we’re happy to have new ones installed in case someone else goes in.”

With the recent success of the Kalbarri Sports Classic and the huge influx of tourists during the holiday season, these safety initiatives couldn’t have come at a better time.