UPDATE: Questions to be answered around Swan River algal bloom

UPDATE ON THE SWAN RIVER ALGAL BLOOM 09/01/2020:

The Department of Health has updated its toxic algal bloom warning to include parts of the Canning River.

The update follows earlier health advice, warning people not to eat fish, crabs or shellfish collected from within the Swan River – from Pelican Point to Como Jetty and upstream to Tonkin Highway Bridge (this includes the commonly known areas of Matilda Bay, Perth Waters, Elizabeth Quay, Barrack Street Jetty, Claisebrook Cove, Maylands Yacht Club, Ascot Waters and Riverside Gardens) see map below.

Recent testing by the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA) has now identified elevated levels of the same, potentially toxic Alexandrium algae in the Canning River and the health warning has been extended to the area from the South of Perth Yacht Club to Como Jetty and upstream to Kent Street Weir.

More information on the algal bloom here

CLICK HERE FOR A FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTION SHEET

The algae detected by Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions  (DBCA) water sampling is the same as the one detected at elevated levels between February and May last year and can cause paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) in humans leading to symptoms including nausea and vomiting, headaches, blurred and/or double vision, loss of balance, difficulty in swallowing and breathing.

In severe cases, PSP may cause muscular paralysis in people who consume affected shellfish, crabs or fish. Anyone who has consumed shellfish, crabs or fish collected from the affected area of the Swan River and experiences any of these symptoms should seek urgent medical attention, particularly if they have difficulty breathing.

 

This latest algal bloom at a time of many of us are fishing in the river is obviously very alarming – particularly because there was little information around what caused the previous bloom.

Rest assured, Recfishwest will keep you updated on developments and we are seeking answers from DBCA to a number of questions including:

  1. How serious is the risk of eating crabs, fish and shellfish from the affected area?
  2. What has caused this latest bloom?
  3. What does this say about the health of the river when this is the second bloom of this type of algae in less than a year?
  4. What are DBCA and the Government doing to eradicate the algae and making it safe to eat crabs, shellfish and fish from the river again?
  5. What is DBCA and DoH doing to alert people fishing in the affected area who might be unaware of the situation?

Thousands of recfishers fish in the Swan, one of the most important fishing locations in the metro, and we will be doing all we can to make sure this fantastic estuarine environment is properly looked after and protected.

Good signs of recovery for west coast demersal scalefish but we’re not out of the woods yet

With this week marking the lifting of the west coast demersal closure, the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) have released the latest stock assessment science.

We hope those of you who have already headed out to try and bag yourself a dhuie, pinkie or a baldie have managed to get amongst ‘em.

It’s been 10 years since wholesale rule changes were brought in to recover some of these species after all the research showed the stocks were in strife. Since those changes were implemented, recfishers have played our part – a big part – in sticking to the rules designed to achieve a 50 per cent reduction in the catch from 2005/6 levels and recover these slow-growing species’ stocks within a 20-year timeframe.

Now we are at the recovery plan’s mid-way point, the Department have released a west coast demersal update based on their latest research.

READ DPIRD’S WEST COAST DEMERSAL RECOVERY RESEARCH SUMMARY HERE

Good stewardship pays off

It will come as no surprise to many of us who target bottom fish in the metro and the South West that there are some good signs with many more, smaller dhuies being seen in the last few years. This is certainly grounds for cautious optimism, showing that our good work and stewardship, sticking to bag and size limits, and the annual two-month closure, is paying off.

However, we’re not out of the woods yet with the research showing limited evidence of recovery for demersal scalefish stocks in the Mid-West and Kalbarri areas. In addition, there appears to be few older dhuies and pinkies in the Department’s samples from across the whole bioregion (Kalbarri down to Augusta).

This shows there is still away to go and, while the recovery is progressing well, we need to keep doing what we’re doing to ensure the recovery stays on track.

That means doing everything we can to ensure released fish go back healthily. Barotrauma can impact on these species significantly, with the research summary showing that ‘post-release mortality’ – fish dying after being released – is potentially having an impact on the recovery.

So, it’s imperative to handle the fish carefully and use release weights to give them the best chance of going back well, if returning them.

It also highlights why catch and release fishing for demersals is not OK and once you’ve hit your bag limit, it’s important to move on and target other species like pelagics and squid.

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT WHY CATCH AND RELEASE FISHING FOR DEMERSALS IS NOT OK HERE

Taking stock

Clearly, the Department needs to keep gathering scientific evidence to monitor the recovery’s progress.  And this is also where we can all play a big part by donating some of our demersal frames to the Department’s Send Us Your Skeletons sampling program.

The more samples the scientists get – the clearer and more robust picture they can build of the stocks’ health. So do the right thing by the fish and help the Department collect more samples by donating some of your frames to science (you can keep the wings and the cheeks – they just need the heads and the guts intact).

CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE DEPARTMENT’S SEND US YOUR SKELETONS PROGRAM

So, we hope you get to bag a demersal or two for Christmas – but let’s continue to work together to ensure the recovery continues to progress and that there will be plenty of these fantastic fish to go at for us and for future generations of West Aussie fishers.

Looking back, looking forward – new Fisheries Minister announced

On 18 December Premier Mark McGowan announced a reshuffle of his cabinet with Minister Dave Kelly moving out of the Fisheries Portfolio and Minister Peter Tinley stepping into the role.

Dave Kelly at the Harvey Dam marron release earlier this month

Dave Kelly had been the Minister for Fisheries since the 2017 election, and his tenure yielded some ground-breaking initiatives that will benefit recreational fishing in this state for years to come.

Minister Kelly oversaw the changes of barra netting from King Sound in Derby after a joint proposal between Recfishwest and WAFIC (Western Australian Fishing Industry Council) that would solve resource sharing issues in proximity to Derby. This was the first time recreational fishing licence money had been used to resolve such a conflict in a specific area, and the decision set a precedent for the way Recfishwest, WAFIC and government can work towards agreed solutions to resource sharing issues.

Minister Kelly also started the process for the Voluntary Fisheries Adjustment Scheme (VFAS) to restore the balance and bring back bigger better crabs in the Peel Harvey estuary. This announcement was welcomed by the recreational fishing community and honoured an important election commitment the McGowan Government made to restore historic catches of blue swimmer crabs and yellowfin whiting from the commercial sector to the recreational fishing community.

Minister Kelly also helped launch a number of key fishing initiatives including:

Dave Kelly at the launch of WA’s three year FAD trial
  • The State’s first state-wide FADs trial
  • More barramundi stocked into Lake Kununurra
  • Marron stocking into Harvey Dam
  • New artificial reefs for Esperance, Exmouth, Perth and Carnarvon
  • Support of Recfishwest’s Statewide Fishing Safety Strategy
  • Opening cray fishing all year round
  • Economic Dimensions of Recreational Fishing in WA – a $2.4 billion industry
  • Continued support and funding for Fishability
  • Launching the new WA Inland Fisheries Research Advisory Committee
  • Opening the South West freshwater fishing season all year
The new minister for fisheries Hon Peter Tinley AM MLA

We thank Minister Kelly for his contributions during his time as Minister of the Fisheries Portfolio and wish him the best in his new portfolio.

Recfishwest welcome Minister Tinley into the role of Fisheries Minister and we are sure the positive relationship we currently have with the McGowan government will continue with more positive and innovative ways to ensure West Aussies have safe, accessible, sustainable and enjoyable fishing experiences forever.

Recfishwest community awards 2019

It’s been a big year for fishing in WA– 300,000 barramundi released in Lake Kununurra, a new State-wide FADs trial and officially evaluating rec fishing as being worth $2.4 billion annually to the W.A. economy – to name just three huge wins.

It’s a good time to reflect on the year and recognise the great contributions of some of the unsung heroes in the recfishing community.

The fishing community is made up of many dedicated, passionate and hardworking people who often don’t get recognised for the tireless work they do. Our recfishing sector benefits  from people standing up for what they believe in, sharing their passion and developing new and innovative ways of promoting the diverse array of fishing experiences we have in WA. With their support and  outstanding contributions, we’re confident the future of WA recfishing looks bright.

It is with great pleasure that the Recfishwest team celebrates individuals and groups within the fishing community who help make fishing better, by recognising them through our inaugural annual Recfishwest Community Awards. The recipients of the awards are as follows:

CLUB, GROUP OR ASSOCIATION RECOGNITION AWARD

This award is in recognition of a club, group or association that are regarded as community champions shaping the fishing future for their local community and making outstanding contributions towards improving fishing experiences. The recipient of this award has proactively searched for new opportunities and continually striven for better fishing opportunities in the hope that locals and visitors can catch that fish of a lifetime, every time.

We would like to congratulate the Lake Kununurra Barramundi Stocking Group as the recipient of this award for their stocking and tagging efforts over the past year. With the help of North Regional TAFE, these local champions have worked passionately to get more barramundi stocked into Lake Kununurra. The group has also tagged hundreds of barra in the lake to track their growth and development over time to ensure barramundi fishing has a bright future in the East Kimberley.

It is a fitting tribute to the hard work and vision of the local community over the last 20 years that Lake Kununurra is now regarded as a world-class trophy barramundi fishery. Well done to all those involved. Read more about this fishery here.

ENVIRONMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY RECOGNITION AWARD

This award gives recognition for environmental initiatives implemented to support recreational fishing experiences. As environmental sustainability becomes increasingly important for communities and the recreational fishing industry, it’s important we lead the way in sustainable innovation, practices and projects to protect what we all love for future generations to come.

We are thrilled to present this award to Ecotone Consulting for their work on ways to improve the sustainability of WA’s iconic marron fishery through research, breeding and stocking.

The project saw Pemberton Freshwater Research Centre (PFRC) staff capture marron as part of a breeding trial to that released thousands of tiny ‘crayling’ (juvenile marron) into Harvey Dam, a popular recreational marron fishing location. The trial’s success allowed Recfishwest to convince the Government to invest recreational fishing licence fees into stocking 300,000 marron into popular fishing dams over the next three years. This commitment is a huge first step toward the dream we share with the community of giving recfishers and families the opportunity to go marroning every weekend and every school holiday. Read more about the marron stocking projects here and here.

PROJECT RECOGNITION AWARD

This award recognises projects that not only deliver great fishing outcomes for the community but also break new ground through innovation and paves the way for similar projects into the future. Delivering meaningful, innovative and long lasting projects for the community is vital to ensure the ongoing development of our fishing is maintained and enhanced.

The Project Recognition Award goes to Subcon for their outstanding efforts to help drive and deploy Exmouth’s King Reef, Australia’s first Integrated Artificial Reef.

The King Reef project brings together a long held community vision, world-leading engineering solutions and science to benefit the environment and the recreational fishing community of Exmouth. King Reef is now proving to be the fastest developing artificial reef in the country, with over 90 species seen in the reef since it was deployed.

Lead by Matt Allen, Subcon’s passion for artificial reef development is not new to WA, with the Esperance Artificial Reef and the giant Perth Fish Towers also coming under the Subcon brand. By harnessing re-purposed steel structures donated from BHP and augmenting them with purpose-built concrete reef modules, Subcon’s influence on King Reef will provide a legacy for the Exmouth community forever. As national leaders in artificial reef engineering, Subcon has helped provide safe, accessible and enjoyable fishing experiences to local and travelling fishers. Read more about King Reef in the following stories:

King Reef WA’s newest fishing playground

First look 28 species in 28 days

40 species seen on Exmouth’s newest fishing playground

Check out the red emperor of Exmouth’s King Reef

FISHING EVENT RECOGNITION AWARD

This award recognises a WA-hosted event which demonstrates growth and agility towards an ever changing and growing recreational fishing sector. The event must significantly contribute to the regional economy by being a major draw-card for the region and attempts to cater for varying levels of fishing abilities.

This award is being presented to Carnar-fin, one of WA’s premier fishing events, held in Carnarvon each year and organised by the Carnarvon Chamber of Commerce. Carnar-fin is an annual fishing competition open to recreational fishers of all skill levels, and has been held in the last week of May since its inception in 1992.

The competition attracts a wide range of fishers from the region and around the state and injects an estimated $600,000 into the Carnarvon economy every year.

The event is different from many others in the sense that all fish that are to be weighed in have to be gutted, gilled and in good condition. This ensures that any fish caught and weighed in, is then not wasted and remains in good eating condition. This is a great example of fishers demonstrating best practice with their catch.

The event is sponsored and supported by a large number of local businesses, highlighting the importance of the event and the value these sponsors see in Carnar-fin to the town and to the region.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COMMUNITY CHAMPION AWARD

The Recfishwest Community Champion Award recognises an outstanding individual who demonstrates leadership and commitment towards the betterment of recreational fishing in their local community.

It is with great pleasure we congratulate Steve Riley – Co-owner of Exmouth Tackle and Camping Supplies, for his exceptional work to make fishing better in Exmouth, particularly in his hard work to push for an artificial reef to provide safe accessible and enjoyable fishing for small boats, families and tourists within the Exmouth Gulf.

For those of you who have travelled to Exmouth to enjoy the great outdoors, or have had the opportunity to have a go at the variety of great fishing opportunities, you’ve probably run into Steve – known as one of Exmouth’s great fishing characters.

Steve lives and breathes fishing. But most important is Steve’s enthusiasm to share his fishing knowledge and encourage everyone to have a go at the great fishing that Exmouth coastline has to offer.

Steve has been awarded the Community Champion award for his exceptional work in all facets of the King Reef Artificial Reef Project in Exmouth. Steve championed for a reef many years ago, and gained local support, applied for funding, and provided local advice on the best location for the reef. Now he is actively involved in the Exmouth Reef Vision monitoring program for King Reef and provides on ground support to volunteers.

Recfishwest would like to once again congratulate the recipients of the 2019 Recfishwest Recognition Awards and we thank them for the contributions they’ve made toward recreational fishing. 

 

Great survey with prizes to help grow our understanding of artificial structures’ value to recfishers

As much of the WA fishing community is aware, the north-west of Western Australia has both productive fisheries and extensive offshore oil and gas infrastructure.

A great amberjack caught by Nick at the Key Biscayne wreck out from Lancelin.

These structures support a range of demersal and pelagic fish that have all the ingredients for world class fishing but are often within no-fishing zones due to oil and gas exclusions.

As discussed in the latest article from editor of Western Angler Magazine, Scott Coghlan, there are some great opportunities that could benefit the fishers and divers of WA by repurposing offshore oil and gas structures into artificial reefs. Read what Scott had to say here.

Recfishwest would rather see offshore infrastructure retained and enhanced to form thriving marine habitats to help build resilience in our oceans and provide communities with more fishing opportunities for many years to come.

The following survey link is a great opportunity to quantify how important these structures are to fishing and diving and to highlight why they should be retained and enhanced.

Survey link here.

Also anyone who fishers off any of WA’s jetties, piers or platforms are asked to complete the survey and demonstrate the value these structures are to your fishing.

Everyone who completes the survey will also go in the draw to win one of three $750 visa cards that are up for grabs.

The top banner image is of the Key Biscayne which is an example of a rig that is now a world-class dive site and exceptional fishing location after it was lost in a storm on route to Fremantle in 1983 and now rests in 42m of water, 20km south-west from Lancelin. Picture from ImageDive.com 

Lancelin Angling and Aquatic Club’s boat safety day

Recfishwest always love an opportunity to connect with the fishing community, and on December 8 we were invited to be part of the Lancelin Angling and Aquatic Club’s first Boat ‘N’ Trailer Day at their Lancelin clubrooms.

The idea of the event was to bring fishers in with their boats and help them keep on top of their trailer, boat and engine maintenance ahead of the coming summer/autumn fishing season.

There was a circuit set up for all the boats and their trailers to be able to cycle through and have their boat inspected by professionals from Big Five Marine who knew what to look for. One lucky boater even had his wheel bearings repacked as part of a demonstration!

It was a great opportunity to have a yarn with all the local fishers who came through the event and it was great to hear they were all very happy with their local fishing opportunities, with many out the morning before pulling pots and bring home a great feed of crays.

The event was also attended by St John WA – Lancelin, the Volunteer Fire Brigade and the passionate Lancelin Volunteer Marine Rescue Western Australia team. This allowed fishers to meet the kind and energetic emergency service people that have their back if something ever goes wrong out on the water, or even on their way to and from the ramp.

We were also privileged to be shown around the VMR’s new premises after the event and it was inspiring to hear about all the businesses and companies that had rolled up their sleeves and pitched in to help build their new shed and office. We chatted to the vollies about their recent rescue efforts and their beloved vessels they keep in premium condition between rescues. The event shows the Lancelin fishing community is in great shape. Their upcoming John Bray Classic on 27 December is another popular community event and has had over 140 children attend in previous years. It was heartening to see the community coming together to help keep everyone safe, maintain their gear and meet the enthusiastic crews that will be there if all else fails.

Check out the club’s website here to see all the upcoming events and competitions here – http://www.laac.org.au/

Great community project see black bream released into the Murray River

There is something great about seeing popular fishing species being stocked into popular fishing spots. Recfishwest was on hand recently as young students from John Tonkin College and Murdoch University released thousands of black bream into the Murray River as part of their aquaculture program.

The young bream were reared by students in college aquariums, fed with brine shrimp, also grown at the college, and health-checked before being released into the river at approximately 30mm long.

John Tonkin College’s aquaculture program is proving to be popular with the students and this program is set to be repeated in 2020 meaning even more bream will be released and even more kids will develop a close affinity to bream and learn about the importance of our estuary systems. We hope this program helps to ignite the passion of these future scientists, leaders and fishers.

 

You can read more about the project here: https://www.peel.wa.gov.au/breaming-with-opportunities/

Murray River bream release

A great project from Murdoch Uni, John Tonkin College students and the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council saw 5,000 juvenile black bream released this week into the Murray River.The young bream were reared by students in college aquariums, fed with brine shrimp, also grown at the college, and health-checked before being released into the river. We're stoked to see community-based stocking efforts like this, especially for popular recfishing species like black bream and we hope thiis first batch of fish will lay a solid foundation for future bream stocking efforts.You can read more about the project here: https://www.peel.wa.gov.au/breaming-with-opportunities/

Posted by Recfishwest on Wednesday, December 11, 2019

Picture credit: The Peel-Harvey Catchment Council.

 

 

Albany and Cape Naturaliste FADs make a splash!

THE SOUTH AND SOUTH WEST GET THE FADS TREATMENT

Another big week for the WA recfishing community and another big splash with two new sets of fish aggregating devices (FADs) deployed – this time off Cape Naturaliste and Albany.

A great tuna from Murray Harcus, a species of which we expect to see lots at both the Cape Naturaliste and Albany FADs

What’s more the first reported capture of a dolphinfish off our metro FADs – just three weeks after they were deployed has got WA fishing social media buzzing!

We said we would deliver a State-wide trial network of FADs and that’s exactly what we’re doing with FADs now deployed in four different locations in the southern half of the State (off the north metro, west of Rotto, Cape Naturaliste and Albany) with Geraldton, Exmouth and Broome to come in early 2020.

The first reported capture of a dolphinfish at our metro FADs by Hon-su from Tackle West

The FADs off Cape Naturaliste should open up some great new sport-fishing opportunities for boat fishers in the south-west of the State with dolphinfish and tuna to be the likely targets, while the devices off Albany are potentially a bit of a wild card with recfishing FADs never having been deployed off WA’s south coast before.

But the local fishers in Albany, with whom we’ve been closely consulting on the project, reckon tuna and potentially yellowtail kingfish could be the go – but can’t count out dolphinfish even that far south as they have been caught there before.

 

ALBANY FADS COORDINATES AND MAP

CAPE NATURALISTE FAD COORDINATES AND MAP

This is partly what makes this three-year trial project so exciting – we’re not quite sure what’s going to turn up on the FADs.

Blake from Compleat Angler and Camping World Rockingham with the second-ever reported dolphinfish caught at the metro FADs.

What we do know is that the Perth Game Fishing Club has been successfully running a tremendous FADs program west of Rotto for the last two decades, FADs have been successfully used to create exciting new fishing opportunities in the Eastern states and all around the globe, and there is a strong community appetite for them here.

It’s another example of how recfishing licence fees can be used to create fantastic new sports fishing opportunities aggregating abundant schools of fast-growing, spectacular-fighting pelagic species and it’s already shaping up to be a really exciting summer of fishing!

And a big shout out to Chris and the 2 Oceans Tackle guys for all their efforts in getting the Cape Naturaliste FADs in the water.

We hope you can get out and give these new FADs a crack soon – drop us a line and let us know how you go. We’d love to hear from you.

CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE FADS PROGRAM

CLICK HERE FOR COORDINATES AND MAPS OF ALL THE PLANNED FAD LOCATIONS

 

A big step forward to year-round marroning

The Premier Mark McGowan and Fisheries Minister Dave Kelly joined Recfishwest at Harvey Dam for a marron stocking event to announce a trial stocking program that will see 300,000 marron released into south-west dams in the next three years.

The trial stocking program is one of a suite of programs given the green light as part of the latest Recreational Fishing Initiatives Fund (RFIF), funded by our fishing licence fees, to improve recfishing in WA.

Marron is unique to WA and fishing for it is a hugely popular pastime in south-west WA with great potential to not just future-proof it, but open it up even more to the community, which is what this project aims to explore.

One of the program’s objectives is to assess the viability of introducing two million juvenile marron over a five-year period – imagine how good that would be for the 10,000 licensed marron fishers.

With the WA State Premier publicly throwing his weight behind this great project, it’s a big step toward the dream we share with the community to give recfishers and families the opportunity to go marroning every weekend and every school holiday.

It’s also another example of Government recognising the value of recfishing to the WA community and subsequently investing our licence fees in improving and increasing our fishing opportunities.  It comes on the back of a fantastic few months that have seen 200,000 more barra released into Lake Kununurra, the announcement of a trial three-year national FADs network program and a new artificial reef to be deployed off Carnarvon (another project to be funded from this RFIF round).

There are also a bunch of other great projects announced as part of this RFIF round including a Salmon Spectacular fishing comp and festival this autumn Recfishwest is running, the Seeds for Snapper Cockburn Sound seagrass restoration project, along with the Carnarvon Artificial Reef.

READ MORE ABOUT PROJECTS FUNDED IN THE LATEST RFIF ROUND

It’s all stacking up for a really exciting 2020 – and we’re sure you like us can’t wait to see what the next 12 months hold. Rest assured, we will continue to throw ourselves into making more recfishing dreams for our community turn into reality – just watch this space!

The next cab off the rank – new artificial reef announced for Carnarvon

In exciting news for recfishers living in or visiting the Gascoyne, a new artificial reef funded through a $300,000 Recreational Fishing Initiatives Fund grant is to be deployed off the Carnarvon coast.

While an exact location for the reef will be determined in consultation with the Carnarvon fishing community it will be located far enough out to create exciting fishing opportunities, but close enough in for small boats and families to safely reach and enjoy.

Recfishwest CEO Dr Andrew Rowland said, “Members of the Carnarvon community are passionate about their fishing and for several years have been working hard to demonstrate why Carnarvon needs a reef and the value it would provide. It is great to see the government have listened to the community and committed to deliver new fishing experiences funded using recreational fishing licence fees.”

The Carnarvon reef will be WA’s eighth purpose-built artificial reef, with reefs already in place at Bunbury, Dunsborough, Rottnest Island, Mandurah, Exmouth, Esperance and another coming to Perth’s northern suburbs in early 2020.

“Positive fishing development projects are starting to mould the West Aussie rec fishing landscape. With six artificial reefs already in the water, the recent exciting announcement about the new State-wide FADs program and now Carnarvon’s artificial reef, recreational fishing in WA is going from strength to strength.”  Dr Rowland said.

The Carnarvon reef will provide local and visiting fishers with a great place to fish for local prized species. Following the success of artificial reefs in other locations, the Carnarvon community are very excited about how good their fishing will be once this reef is in the water. Today’s announcement is one we and the Carnarvon community will particularly welcome given the ongoing loss of access to the iconic Carnarvon jetty.

Fishing is part of the West Aussie lifestyle and part of our culture, and investments from Government and Recfishwest into new fishing developments, such as artificial reefs enhance people’s fishing experiences, provide increased localised tourism and deliver economic benefits that all helps support healthy communities.

To read more about our artificial reefs program click here.

We are looking forward to beginning the public consultation and tender process for the design and construction of the reef which is due to begin in mid-2020.

Fisheries Minister Dave Kelly said, “Artificial reefs not only provide great fishing opportunities, but also support local businesses and regional jobs by attracting more visitors to the area and increasing participation in recreational fishing.”

Mining and Pastoral Region MLC Kyle McGinn said, “This is a great initiative and will be a huge asset to the Carnarvon community. I have seen an artificial reef work extremely well in Exmouth and make a positive contribution to both locals and tourists.”

Recfishwest looks forward to working with the local Carnarvon fishing community and continuing talks with Carnarvon recfishers to ensure an optimum location and layout for their reef.

Read what the Minister for Fisheries had to say about the new reef here.