No Benefit in Changing Marine Park Plans

Recent claims by WA philanthropist Andrew Forrest,  that suggest changes to the current Commonwealth Marine Parks Plans will benefit recreational fishing in WA are simply wrong!

Recfishwest, the fishing community and our stakeholders have worked hard for years on Marine Park equity for all and we believe the current plans provide just that.

The current plans were developed using best available science with considerable input from all user groups.

The value of recreational fishing has been recognised in the current plan, which is a good balance between community fishing access and the environment!

The recreational fishing community are champions of the aquatic environment – we too support plastic free oceans and healthy fish stocks.

We continually invest in projects focused on habitat protection, restoration & enhancement, rejuvenating our waterways and environmental stewardship.

We would welcome any assistance Mr Forrest could provide to help recreational fishers continue deliver these positive outcomes for the marine environment.

Recfishwest support marine parks that are created for the purpose of recreation, science, education, conservation and enhanced visitor experiences. We believe marine park zoning must be underpinned by science and should be implemented using simple, practical management that is risk-based, transparent and subject to regular review.

 To read more about our position about Marine Parks, visit: https://recfishwest.org.au/news/new-commonwealth-marine-parks-announced/

Put Snapper on Your Agenda at Community Info Sessions

The Westport Taskforce want to hear from you.

Over the years there have been a number of proposals for a new harbour in Cockburn Sound. There is currently a taskforce (Westport) who aim to tell the government what the future transport needs of Western Australia will be and how to best achieve them.

The Westport taskforce will be holding three community information sessions across July and August in Fremantle, Kwinana and Bunbury and keen and interested fishers are encouraged to head down to let this taskforce know what you think. Due to venue limits, RSVP’s are essential.

Details of the upcoming information sessions can be found below:

Session details
Westport invite you to drop-in at any time during the two-hour sessions to speak with members of the Westport team.

Fremantle
Date and time: Wednesday 11 July 2018 – 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Venue: Stackwood – 10 Stack Street, Fremantle 6160

Kwinana
Date and time: Wednesday 18 July 2018 – 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Venue: Darius Wells Centre, Ken Jackman Room – Cnr Chisham Avenue and Robbos Place, Kwinana 6167

Bunbury
Date and time: Wednesday 1 August 2018 – 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Venue: Maker + Co – 75B Victoria Street, Bunbury 6230

Due to venue limits, RSVPs are essential.
Please email or call 6551 6479 to register and indicate which session you wish to attend.
For more information visit the Department of Transport website here:
https://www.transport.wa.gov.au/…/westport-port-and-environ…

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Recfishwest have secured a position on the environmental work group for the Westport taskforce so you can be sure this task force is well aware of the importance of snapper breeding grounds, seagrass nursery meadows, iconic wrecks and a number of other factors that make Cockburn Sound so important for fishing. Recfishwest has already provided a submission on the preparation of the Westport Strategy and we will provide submissions at every stage of the process until the final report is released towards the end of 2019.

Now is the time to provide input and ensure decision makers have the best available information with which to make the best possible decision. Should bad decisions be made because no one has given the taskforce the right information in the first place then we will only have ourselves to blame.

While we do not know what the final recommendation of the Westport taskforce will be, Recfishwest will continue to fight to protect the fishing experiences provided by Cockburn Sound just as we have been doing for decades.

A few people have asked where Recfishwest stand on an Outer Harbor.

To read Recfishwest’s position on the Outer Harbour issue see below: 

Recfishwest Protecting Cockburn Sound_Outer Harbour Position_July 2018

 

Local Hands to Build Esperance Reef

Esperance artificial reef build begins

ESPERANCE EXPRESS

Jesinta Burton

Read it online here.

The long awaited Esperance Artificial Reef development is another step closer with construction having officially commenced on Wednesday, June 6.

Local volunteers from the Esperance Deep Sea Angling Club will partake in a number of ‘busy bee’s’ throughout the month of June in order to build the artificial reef.

The $600,000 artificial reef development has been several years in the making.

Related stories:

The development came to fruition in December 2016, after it was announced it would receive $300,000 in funding from the Recreational Fishing Initiatives Fund.

In March last year, the project doubled in size after the Goldfields Esperance Development Commission matched the existing funding.

The local vision, which has now developed into a 150 tonne project, was designed to rectify the substantial loss of fishing access in the region due to geographical and environmental factors.

South East Coast Recreational Fishing Council chairman Graham Cooper said it was a special feeling to know that the reef build was something that both members and their children would be able to enjoy.

“It’s great that we could keep the work and the reef materials sourced locally,” he said.

“I can’t wait to catch a queenie or a sambo on a reef that the Esperance fishing community built with their own hands.”

Recfishwest Research officer James Florisson said the reef design was configured specifically for local species and had been thoughtfully designed by engineers, marine biologists and ecologists.

Mr Florisson said the reef configuration would create a productive ecosystem for a variety of different species of fish.

“It will provide a home for species such as Queen Snapper, Breaksea Cod, Skippy, Harlequin and Pink Snapper,” he said.

“This could not have been done without the support of the community and the volunteers who have worked tirelessly to make this happen.”

The reef was built and will be installed by artificial reef experts at global marine foundation Subcon.

It is expected the reef will be deployed in September this year.

Restoring the Balance: The 1st Step to Bigger Better Crabs

Media Release, 11 October 2018

  • Recfishwest Vision – Bigger Better Crabs for Peel Harvey
  • Minister Prioritises and Protects Family Fishing Experiences
  • The Right Abundances in the Right Places

Recfishwest welcomes today’s announcement from Fisheries Minister Dave Kelly, to establish a buyback scheme for commercial fishing licences in the Peel-Harvey Estuary. This announcement honours an important election commitment the McGowan government made to recreational fishers.

The Peel Harvey Estuary is the spiritual home of recreational crabbing with thousands of family’s flocking to Mandurah every year to enjoy the experience of catching their own seafood across the summer months.

Recfishwest Operations Manager Leyland Campbell commended the Minister and his actions.

 “Crabbing and fishing in the estuary is the lifeblood of the region and today’s announcement means more Blue Swimmer Crabs and Yellowfin Whiting will be left in the water for fishing families.”

 “Recfishwest have been calling for change to management arrangements in this fishery for over a decade and by honouring their election commitment the McGowan Government are supporting safe, accessible and enjoyable fishing experiences for all West Aussies.”

“The scheme is designed to allocate more Blue Swimmer Crabs and Yellowfin Whiting to recreational fishing families and is a positive first step in bringing big crabs back to the region.” Mr Campbell said.

Recfishwest are happy with the creation of a mechanism allowing recreational fishing licence money to assist with resolving resource reallocation issues. This sets an important and positive precedence for restoring the right balance between commercial and recreational fishing.

Recfishwest looks forward to continuing to work with the Minster and the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development to ensure greater recreational fishing experiences in the region.

Read Fisheries Minister Dave Kelly’s Media Statement here.

Location of Exmouth Artificial Reef Announced

Fisheries Minister Dave Kelly – Media Statement

Fishing licence fees help create an Exmouth integrated artificial reef
Wednesday, 16 May 2018

– New artificial reef will enhance Exmouth fishing experience
– Funded by recreational fishing licence fees through the Recreational Fishing Initiatives Fund, and supported by BHP and National Energy Resource Australia

Fisheries Minister Dave Kelly today announced the location for Exmouth’s new Integrated Artificial Reef (IAR).

The new $1 million artificial reef will be one of Australia’s largest artificial reefs and will be located near the Exmouth Boat Harbour inside the Exmouth Gulf, providing the community with new safe and accessible fishing opportunities.

More than 27,000 cubic metres of concrete and steel structures will be installed on the sandy bottom of the Exmouth Gulf. The project brings together world-leading engineering solutions and science-based habitat enhancement, all to benefit recreational fishing.

Local WA company and world leaders in artificial reef architecture, Subcon International, received funding to develop the reef from last year’s round of the Recreational Fishing Initiatives Fund (RFIF).

The Exmouth reef differs in both size and design to WA’s other artificial reefs. A mixture of steel integrated with concrete will form the reef’s 58 modules, which will range in height from one metre to 10 metres and laid out across two acres on the ocean floor. Once deployed, the 27,000 cubic metres of reef volume will be equal to that of 11 Olympic-sized swimming pools.

25 per cent of recreational licence fees collected by the Government, goes to the RFIF for investment back into the sector. A further 15 per cent of licence fees goes towards funding for Recfishwest, with the balance of licence fee money supporting fisheries management through the department.

Comments attributed to Fisheries Minister Dave Kelly:

“I am very pleased to announce the location of the Exmouth Integrated Artificial Reef, which will create a new, accessible, safe fishing location for recreational fishers.

“I look forward to seeing the artificial reef, which was partly funded by the State Government, effectively enhance the recreational fishing experience in WA.

“Thousands of people descend upon Exmouth for a fishing getaway but sometimes the winds and swell is unfavourable.

“This new reef will offer tourists and locals an alternative fishing in the safety of the gulf, which can only add to the appeal Exmouth has as an iconic WA fishing destination.

“The McGowan Government is delivering on its election commitment that ensures 25 per cent of recfishing licence fees are invested back into the sector through the RFIF.”

Minister’s office – 6552 6100

Exmouth Artificial Reef Location_PreDeployment_May2018

New Artificial Reef Coming to Perth’s Northern Suburbs

Fisheries Minister Media Release

Tuesday, 15 May 2018

– $1.9 million worth of new projects to put your fishing licence fees to work for you
– Since 2012, about $10 million from licence money has funded recfishing projects
– Perth’s northern metro waters will get an artificial reef to enhance fish habitats

A new artificial reef for Perth’s northern suburbs is one of 11 new recfishing projects worth almost $2 million that will be funded from recreational fishing licence money, through the latest round of the Recreational Fishing Initiatives Fund (RFIF).

The McGowan Government will decide the specific location of the $1 million artificial reef through consultation with the fishing community and other stakeholders.

The announcement of a new northern metropolitan reef, comes five years after the deployment of Western Australia’s first ever artificial reef for fishing in Bunbury. Once in the water, the northern metropolitan reef will become WA’s seventh purpose-built artificial reef.

Other projects funded through the RFIF will be announced in the coming months.

The McGowan Government has delivered on its election commitment to the RFIF that ensures 25 per cent of recreational fishing licence money is invested back into recfishing. Projects funded provide safe, sustainable, accessible and enjoyable recreational fishing experiences in Western Australia.

WA’s Recreational Fishing Initiatives Fund has already provided more than $10 million for projects that benefit WA fishers, while having additional tangible outcomes for fish habitats, the environment and research.

For more information, visit https://recfishwest.org.au/rfif

Comments attributed to Fisheries Minister Dave Kelly:

“In 2015, WA Labor stood side by side with Recfishwest to protect this important fund, when the former government tried to cut it.

“The McGowan Government is delivering on its election commitment that ensures 25 per cent of recfishing licence money is invested back into the sector through the RFIF.

“A further 15 per cent of licence fees goes towards funding for Recfishwest, with the balance of licence fee money supporting fisheries management through the department.

“We’ve asked WA fishers where they want their licence money spent and artificial reefs continually come out towards the top of the list.

“Artificial reefs can provide quality fishing opportunities to help fishers avoid having to travel excessive distances or venture into rough waters, and they can also mean a huge boost for localised tourism as well as a win for fish habitats.

“A new artificial reef will enhance the recfishing opportunities for the growing northern suburbs.

“The goal of the McGowan Government is to ensure Western Australians have safe, accessible, sustainable and enjoyable fishing experiences for years to come.”

Minister’s office – 6552 6100

New Commonwealth Marine Parks Announced

Recfishwest welcomed the latest Commonwealth Marine Reserves Management plans, released in March 2018, which  recognises the importance of fishing in WA.

Recfishwest CEO Dr. Andrew Rowland at Parliament House, Canberra, this week.

Recfishwest Operations Manager Leyland Campbell said these new evidence based management plans deliver a much more balanced approach than we have seen in the past and I am pleased the value of recreational fishing  has finally been acknowledged as a key value of Marine Parks.

“These plans are definitely a large improvement on the plans produced by the previous Government which locked fishers out of large areas of the ocean for no apparent reason.  The plans may not be perfect but they are the best I have seen throughout this whole process. ” Mr Campbell said.

“After years of uncertainty and long drawn-out discussions, today’s announcement is a much better outcome for fishing, a much better outcome for the community and a much better outcome for the environment.”

“These new plans maintain access to many of the iconic fishing locations around WA, including the Rottnest Trench and the South West’s Geographe Bay, both of which had previously earmarked important areas for closure. This means the descendants of West Aussies who have sustainably fished these places for generations can continue to have the same wonderful experiences. Some of the issues of most concern that we raised with the Commonwealth Government appear to have been taken on board.

“I urge everyone to support these new plans as they show a good balance between the needs of all reasonable stakeholders.”

Although these new plans appear to strike a good balance between the needs of all stakeholders the usual groups will no doubt be once again making outrageous and unsubstantiated claims about the level of protection provided by the plans even though these new plans provide the sea floor with 200,000 square kilometres more protection than the previous plans. These usual groups won’t be satisfied until all fishing is stopped or until the political party they identify with is the one to introduce management plans.

“I believe the management plans announced today are most comprehensive and sensible plans released to date and balance the needs of all reasonable stakeholders better than any of the previous plans.  We urge all sensible fishers and community members to support these plans.”

You can access the new plans here.

Recfishwest support marine parks that are created for the purpose of recreation, science, education, conservation and enhanced visitor experiences. We believe marine park zoning must be underpinned by science and should be implemented using simple, practical management that is risk-based, transparent and subject to regular review.

Background on Marine Parks

Developing Australia’s network of Marine Parks has been a very long and time consuming process. Recfishwest has been participating in this process from the beginning and has invested many years and submitted countless submission during this time.

In 1998 Australia committed to establishing a National Representative System of Marine Protected Areas (Marine Parks) and developed guideline for establishing these Parks.  In the 14 years that followed there was a procession of science which included Bioregional Profiles and plans, Regulation Impact Statements, social and economic assessments as well as scientific and expert reports.

In 2011 draft marine park proposals for the South-west, North, North-west, Coral Sea and Temperate East Marine Regions were released and in November 2012 a network of Marine Parks was proclaimed.  In many cases the proclaimed Marine Parks had very little resemblances to the 2011 proposals the public were asked to comment on.

In 2013 as part of an election commitment the Coalition government reproclaimed the Commonwealth marine reserves and set up an independent scientific review of the Marine Reserves. This review started in September 2014, undertook a significant amount of public consultation and was completed in December 2015.

Following the review, new and improved management plans were developed and these new plans were released by the Turnbull Government’s this week. You can access the new plans here.

To compare zoning and maps from the old plan to this latest plan click the links below.

North-West Commonwealth Marine Park Zoning comparison

South-West Commonwealth Marine Park Zoning comparison

Recfishwest’s Position Statement on Marine Parks 

 

Déjà vu for WA fishers as State Government get their hooks into licence fees… again

Fast facts:

  • Second fishing licence fee increase in 12 months;
  • Recfishwest was not consulted; and
  • Recfishwest will be pushing hard to ensure every cent of the additional money delivers maximum benefit to the fishing community.

Despite promising no surprises in this year’s budget, recreational fishers will be in for an unpleasant surprise when they come to renew their fishing licences after another $5 increase in the cost of each of the fishing licences was announced.

This is the second $5 rise in fishing licence fees in the past 12 months.

Recfishwest do not support these increases, we were not consulted about them, we don’t believe they are necessary and we have not been advised how the additional money will be used.

Recfishwest Acting Chief Executive Officer Leyland Campbell said the State Government have made the wrong decision.

“If revenue is a genuine concern to Government, we believe there are far better options to assist with the cost of managing recreational fishing, such as addressing known inefficiencies in the current recreational fishing budget, reviewing the entire licence framework, or investing in projects to increase participation rates in licenced fisheries,” he said.

“Increasing recreational fishing licence fees should not be the first option considered.  Not many businesses would survive if they simply looked to raise prices every time they wanted more money.”

Recfishwest understand there are significant costs involved in managing recreational fishing. However, Leyland said fishers already contribute more than their fair share towards the cost of managing recreational fishing through $8 million in licence fees they currently provide the government every year.

“I don’t know of any other group that contributes so much towards managing their recreational activity and unfortunately as costs have gone up, the service that is being provided has gone down,” he said.

In the past 12 months recreational fishing priority projects have been delayed, reviews of important recreational fisheries have stalled, management changes to improve fishing are not being progressed and now when someone buys a fishing licence they are not provided with a rule book to help them understand what they are and are not allowed to do.

“Any increase in fees should be accompanied by an equivalent increase in service,” Leyland said.

“This did not happen last time the government raised fees and there is no reason to believe service will improve with the new fee increases.”

Recfishwest fears participation rates could even fall as many people are now likely to think twice about whether they can afford to go fishing or worse, they may choose to fish without a licence placing them in danger of prosecution.

Recfishwest will be pushing hard to ensure every cent of the additional $1 million the Government will receive from this increase, plus the additional $1 million they are already receiving from last year’s fee increase is accounted for and delivers maximum benefit to the fishing community.

Although the Minister has promised there will be no more increases in licence fees during this term of Government this promise will be of no comfort to fishers who were already paying the highest recreational fishing fees in the country.

New Pricing for recreational fishing licences below:

Fishing from boat (State-wide) $35 + $5 = $40

Rock Lobster  $45 + $5 = $50

Sout West freshwater angling $45 + $5 = $50

Net fishing (haul, set, throw) $45 + $5 = $50

Abalone $45 + $5 = $50

Marron $45 + $5 = $50

Breamosaurus Showcases the Swan’s Credentials

The Swan River plays a huge part in the culture and lifestyle of many fishers in Perth – giving safe and easy access to great fishing for everyone.

There are 60km of accessible water for every level of fisher in the Swan River, with fishing platforms, jettys and grassed banks providing the thousands of Perth based fishers access, both day and night, to a world class fishing river.

Point Walter Jetty at night – Just one of the many accessible fishing locations on Perth’s Swan River.

Which other river running through an Australian Capital City can you access:

  • World class bream fishing on flats or near structures such as snags and jetties
  • Soaking big baits under the city lights or deep amongst the Mosman moorings for mulloway
  • Flathead and flounder on the flats during warm summer days
  • Drop netting for crabs from the dinghy or jetties
  • Diving or scooping for school and king prawns
  • Diving for crabs at night
  • Trolling for tailor as the Fremantle doctor whips up the water on a summer arvo

There have been plenty of studies that have highlighted the rejuvenated health of the Swan River in recent years and the recent Swanfish event proved again the river is in good shape with plenty of fish caught and released.

Perth’s premier family fishing event, Swanfish, took a new direction this year focusing on catch and release fishing and the results were exciting for the future of the Swan. To showcase the health of the Swan River, the 2018 Swanfish event had 166 fish submitted across 14 species by 249 competitors – in only 24 hours.

The prized catch (which was safely released) was a monster 51cm Black Bream – earning the name ‘Breamosauras’, caught by local bream fisher Clay Anderson.

Breamosaurus‘ – This 51cm Black Bream (big enought to be a legal size Pink Snapper) was caught by Clay Anderson during Swanfish 2018 and successfully released under the new Swanfish catch and release format. Clay also caught a 40cm horse too that day!

Not only will the majority of fishers never get to catch a bream this big in their life, many wouldn’t believe a fish of this size still lives in Perth’s Swan River.

Here are some interesting facts about the catches from Swanfish and some to suggest the river is healthy and thriving!!

Swanfish 2018 Map of some of the catches from participants!
Breakdown of the range of species caught during the Swanfish 2018 weekend.

It’s a High Tide Thing!

Here’s some insight as to when the fish were caught during Swanfish 2018. Although people could fish for a whole 24 hours and some competitors would have only fished the daylight hours, the below graph gives you a good understanding as to when the fish were biting in the Swan – and may help you when fishing the Swan in the future!

You can see by the blue bars (representing fish catches) that the majority of catches came in on the incoming tide and high tide peak. Interesting to note the lack of catches on the outgoing tide and bottom of the low!

Bream are Capable of Travelling….a lot!
The average distance covered by tagged bream throughout a four month innovative and exciting fish tracking program was 33km, with one fish covering a whopping distance of 130km! Another bream on one instance recorded travelling 11km in less than 15 hours.

When not on the move, the tagged fish in the study spent most of their time around Ascot and Caversham (we know this from the underwater acoustic tagging receivers).

Implanting the acoustic tags inside a Black Bream – #surgery on the swan!

There was also movement of some fish between the Swan and Canning Rivers, confirming these populations are interconnected. Some of the bream’s movements through the rivers were found to be linked to heavy rainfall events. While bream are hardy fish that can handle a high salinity range, the tagged fish favoured areas where salinity ranged between 10-20ppt (normal sea water is around 35ppt).

To Read more about this interesting bream project, click here.

Swanfish 2018 Results

With a focus on catch and release fishing and for the first time ever, the use of a purpose-built smartphone app, Swanfish provided participants with a live scoreboard and an instant method of logging their catches.

Longest Blue Swimmer Crab, 69 cm, caught by youngster Lachie McIntosh with Recfishwest’s James and Matt.

The Swanfish App, built by the team at TrackMyFish, allowed fishers to take a photo of their catch and enter it into the competition with only a few simple clicks. The app included a live feed with photos so fishers can see in real time what’s being caught elsewhere on the river. This style of app has been utilised in other fishing events throughout Australia and has proven to be extremely useful for competitors.

Over a one hundred keen fishers came back down on the Sunday morning to claim their prizes!

The app also turned all competitors into citizen scientists for the weekend, as each logged catch went into a database which will be built on over future events. Long term data such as this is vital in providing insight into decision making around river management going forward.

Winner of the random prize draw for the Hobie Revolution 13 Fishing Kayak (courtesy of Getaway Outdoors) went to young fisher Adoni – seen here making himself comfortable in his new kayak!

To see some of the fish entered into Swanfish 2018, check out the Swanfish Facebook Page here.

Keep the Sand Between Your Toes

The time is near! The salmon are rounding the bend of the South-West and heading your way!

Fishing from the beach gives you great access to the big Salmon schools that will make their way along the coast! Photo courtesy of Western Angler.

With the annual salmon migration around the West Australia Coast upon us and the Easter long weekend fast approaching, fishers can go into over drive and go to all extremes to target these fish, often overlooking simple steps to ensure a safe return at the end of the day.

‘Keep the sand between your toes’ as you round up the family and dog, head to a nearby beach and give it a shot at catching these fantastic sport fish.

Sunset beach fishing with the family! Photo credit: Tony Tropiano

Being part of a community of fishers on the beach, experiencing world class fishing whilst spending it with our families is part of our culture and although salmon are a superb sports fish, it’s not worth putting your life at risk when the salmon turn up Recfishwest Chief Executive Officer Dr Andrew Rowland says.

“With countless locations suitable for beach fishing along our coast, offering a variety of experiences depending on the adventure you seek, there’s no excuse to not put personal safety at the forefront of your mind,” Andrew said.

As we’ve seen in previous years, Salmon move in large schools and often track close to shore, hiding in the gutters along the beach awaiting smaller prey, making them accessible from our beaches for fishers of varying abilities and ages. It’s a great way to introduce youngsters to the sport, point out the silver flashes as they dart past and wait for the rod to buckle over.

Fishing is an experience in itself, whether you catch and keep your fish, or release them after the fight, just to be able to bring your fish onto the sand, hear the cheers from fellow fishers and take some snaps with the kids, makes for a memorable outing with the family. The great thing is, if the fish are there, often given away by birds flying over as they pick up remaining bait fish and fish hitting the surface as the salmon force their prey to the top; they are caught using just about any method! Baits, lures, fly’s, you name it, they’ll chase it.

For those seeking the action, the popular spots to fish are along the beaches and headlands of the south western coasts. The sheltered bays around Dunsborough are famous for their salmon fishing as the schools pass through, with Bunker Bay and Rocky Point the most consistent locations. Along the south coast, the mouth of the Warren River, Windy Harbour, Parry’s Beach, Bornholm, Nanarup, Cheynes Beach, Bremer Bay, Reef Beach and Fosters Beach are all fine salmon fishing locations.

Family Salmon Fishing from World Class Beaches! Photo credit: Tony Tropiano

If you want to let those tyres down on your 4wd, White Hills to Preston beach area, Cheynes Beach and Parry’s Beach are popular spots and there will be fish between the capes and Hamelin Bay, making it a great spot to check into the camp grounds nearby and spend the weekend with the kids. Sometimes you’ll find some of these spots quite secluded offering privacy, relaxation and the sense of ‘the perfect getaway’ for some. What more could you want then to drive along a beach, set up the camp chairs, stick a rod in a holder and wait for the school to arrive with great company.

If Salmon isn’t your thing, majority of these beaches also produce Skippy, Whiting, Herring, Samson fish, Bonito and more. Alternatively the rivers on the south coast can offer superb bream fishing, where you’ll find Herring, Skippy, whiting and Squid waiting for a lure to pass by in the estuaries.

Where ever you are and whatever you are targeting, make sure you speak to your local tackle store before heading out, to find a safe beach near you where you can target fantastic fish like Salmon.

Not knowing your surroundings can make it unsafe but also unenjoyable, so please check the weather, read the safety/warning signs, keep an eye out for potential hazards, wear appropriate clothing/footwear and always tell someone y our plans.

Still haven’t arranged your accommodation for this weekend yet? We’ve got you covered! Join us at the annual ‘Great Salmon Campout Event’ for the 24-15th March with offers the fishing weekend getaway that you need without the hassle of having to arrange it yourself.

Recfishwest offer the perfect timing and location to learn how to catch Salmon all jammed into one awesome weekend, where you don’t have to think! Accommodation at Cheynes Beach Caravan Park is inclusive with plenty of activities on offer to keep you and the family busy.

We know that fishing offers many benefits to us both mentally and physically, so why not throw the reef shoes in the car and head down for a cast. Registrations are filling up so please get in quick!

For those heading to Albany for the Easter Weekend, head into your local tackle stores to find our map of safe beach fishing locations, Salmon fishing tips and catch care tips. Free loan life jackets are also available from these stores.

Want to know our top 3 salmon lure picks?  Find them here.

Bait fishing your preferred option? Read about salmon rigs and techniques  here.

To keep up to date where the fish are biting, sign up for our FREE fishing reports here.

This is a Fishing Safety Message brought to you by Fish and Survive!

Heading to Albany this Easter? we’ve put together some Salmon fishing locations for you to try!