Sustainable Seafood Recipe Competition!

To reduce waste and open up a broader range of ingredients for recreational fishers in W.A., fine dining chef Paul Iskov of Fervor (http://www.fervor.com.au/) who specialises in foraging native ingredients has teamed up with marine scientist Dr Jordan Goetze to create a “locals only” sustainable seafood recipe ebook, thanks to a Recfishwest Community Grant they received in the last round of funding.

fish fillets cooked

This book will provide creative recipes that utilise local sustainable seafood products that are normally thrown away and species that Australians rarely consume. Given the best ideas often come from the fishers themselves, Paul and Jordan would like to crowd source some of your best sustainable seafood recipes!

wok fish

The best recipes will be published in the locals only seafood e-book and there are two tickets to a 10 course degustation with Fervor at one of their collaborative dinners in Albany up for grabs for the recipe that best promotes sustainable seafood  (https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/camp-oven-cook-up-tickets-30241648585?aff=erelexpmlt). In addition, Recfishwest is donating a Sienna 2500 reel and 3 Halco lures as prizes for successful submissions.

We are looking for recipes that follow one or more of the principles below:

  • Utilise a species that is known to be sustainable, however, not consumed as readily as other W.A. species. For example, if you can make a Western King Wrasse taste delicious we would love to know how you do it!
  • Uses a part of a fish (or other seafood) that is normally thrown away. For example, a friend recently showed us a way to fillet large fish so you keep the ribs that are normally thrown away with the frame. With some panko and a quick shallow fry these make delicious fish ribs that you can eat with your hands.
  • Utilises the whole fish rather than filleting and throwing away the frame. For example; salt crusted whole Dhufish is not only the best fish you will ever eat but it is super easy to prepare saving you from filleting or scaling the fish and a small one will serve at least one extra person than fillets.
  • Utilises species that are not commonly consumed in Australia. For example, Cockles/Clams are hugely popular in Europe but are rarely seen on a dinner plate here in W.A. despite them occurring in large numbers in ankle deep water with nothing needed except for your hands and a bucket to harvest.

To apply, please send your recipe along with a high-quality photo of the final dish to;

food

Picture: Mick Sippe Images: https://www.facebook.com/Mick-Sippe-Images-1484554851760500/